Friday, August 19, 2016

Refugees, Sinjar Mountain, Kurdistan Iraq.

Many Yazidi people who fled Sinjar when the city fell on August 3rd, 2014 have stayed in temporary or random camps set up on top of the Sinjar mountain in the north of Kurdistan Iraq. It is still not safe to move back to Sinjar, which is only about 20 minutes drive away. Sinjar region, June 2016.
A Yazidi child living with her family in a temporary camp on top of the Sinjar Mountain.
Several temporary refugee camps have been set up on top of the Sinjar Mountain.
Shwan Omar Isa runs a small convenience store on top of the Sinjar mountain.
Young Yazidi men playing pool in one of the random road side camps on top of the Sinjar Mountrain.
Children at one of the temporary camps. 
A child is staying the shade.
Some agriculture is attempted on to off the mountain.
Sinjar city can be seen in the background as you approach the top of the Sinjar mountain. 
These Yazidi chilédren are currently living at the Camp Khanki. They were preparing for a football competition between children from other camps in the Duhok area in northern Iraq. The camp is large with 3120 tents. 2908 families and 16611 people.
The last town before reaching Sinjar. Duhok is about an hour and a half from Sinjar. It was never atacked by ISIS although ISIS rached very close, after Sinjar fell in August 2014.
In order to have documents written in Duhok, you need to stop by a print store.
Kurdish people enjoying the evening witgh games and tea. Duhok, Northern Iraq/ Kurdistan.  Here, Sherzad, the owner of the restaurant, is playing with his friends.
Kurdish men enjoying the evening with games and tea. Duhok, Northern Iraq/ Kurdistan.
Lalesh, in northern Iraq, not to far from Duhok, is the spiritual village or the Holiest place for the Yazidi people. 
A shooting position used by ISIS inside the hospital in Sinjar. 
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